Design and Technology

Currently the department offers Level 2 Engineering Award as below -

Unit 1: The Engineered World

Level: 1 and 2

Unit type: Core

Guided learning hours: 30

Assessment type: External

Unit introduction

What is ‘engineering’? Is it using materials and processes to manufacture a single item? Is it applying new technologies to the mass production of well-known products? Or is it implementing methods to reduce waste and improve the sustainability of energy sources? 

Engineering is all of these things and many more. It affects all aspects of our lives, from the daily use of time-saving appliances, to performance materials applied in ways we may never have imagined.

In this unit, you will discover the world of engineering. You will investigate the processes used to manufacture modern products within different engineering sectors. You will also study some of the new developments in materials and engineering technology that have an impact on life today – or will have in the very near future.

Engineers must be aware that products and processes may require the use of scarce resources that could have an impact on the environment. When an engineered product is made, used and disposed of, any waste of energy and environmental damage must be minimised at all stages. Therefore, you will also investigate waste reduction and sustainability issues from an engineering perspective, discovering how engineers can help control and reduce environmental damage.

Learning aims

In this unit you will:

  • A - know about engineering processes used to produce modern engineered products
  • B - know about developments in engineering materials and technologies
  • C - understand how engineering contributes to a sustainable future.

Unit 2: Investigating an Engineering Product

Level: 1 and 2

Unit type: Core

Guided learning hours: 30

Assessment type: Internal

Unit introduction

Have you ever wondered how engineered products progress from an idea in a designer’s head to the finished article ready for use? When a product is being designed to meet a need, crucial decisions must be taken. 

The designer must ask key questions about the product, for example what form might it take; what functions must it fulfil; what user and performance requirements must be included; and what materials should be used to make it fit for purpose.

Materials used in a product are not selected at random. From the thousands of options available, materials are chosen on the basis of their specific properties and whether they match the needs of the product.

When a product is manufactured, particular production processes are used so that component parts are made accurately, quickly and to the same high quality standards time after time. 

As part of the quality assurance (QA) process, quality control (QC) checks are carried out during manufacture on materials and component parts to ensure the finished product reaches users in the best possible condition.

In this unit you will investigate a manufactured product to learn what considerations a designer would keep in mind when writing a technical specification. You will investigate the materials and commercial production processes used to manufacture the product, in order to learn why they were used in preference to others that might also have been appropriate. You will also learn how certain materials and processes can affect the environment.

In studying quality issues, you will come to understand how the quality of a product is assured throughout its manufacture, and you will learn how specific forms of quality control contribute to overall quality assurance.

Learning aims

In this unit you will:

  • A -  understand the performance requirements of an engineered product
  • B -  understand the selection of specific materials for use in the components that make up an engineered product
  • C -  understand the selection and use of manufacturing processes in an engineered product
  • D -  understand the quality issues related to an engineered product.

Unit 7: Machining Techniques

Level: 1 and 2

Unit type: Optional specialist

Guided learning hours: 60

Assessment type: Internal

Unit introduction

Did you know that you can use lathes or milling machines and drills in different ways when you are machining engineered products? The machines that you will use as part of this unit are some of the most important pieces of engineering equipment.

Most modern Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machine tools have been developed from conventional lathes, milling machines and drills. This unit will help you to understand the engineering processes that we use to generate and form shapes through machining techniques. You will learn how to select, investigate and use machining techniques that involve shaping or forming with loss of volume. You will also use work-holding devices and a range of tools so that you can carry out a variety of machining processes.

You will learn how to set the machines before you use them and how to monitor the machines while you are using them. You will also learn how to inspect the items you produce for compliance and accuracy.

Health and safety is vital. Therefore, you will also learn how to operate machinery safely.

Learning aims

In this unit you will:

  • A - select and use tools and work-holding devices for drilling and for turning or milling
  • B - make workpieces using drilling and turning or milling techniques safely.

Assessment Without Levels

The following document highlights the skills required to meet each grade using our new Assessment Without Levels system.


Design and Technology Staff

Mr N. Kilty Head of Department
Mrs J. Singleton Head of Health and Social Care / Teacher of Food Technology
Mr R. Weaver Teacher of Design and Technology
Miss R. Critchley Design and Technology Technician

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